"The Burning Stone" Kate Elliott

The Burning Stone is the third book in Kate Elliott's seven book series, The Crown of Stars. As I finished the last one in the series at the end of December last year I was starting to think I should write the rest of them up in one post. But when I looked at my notes, I think I've enough to say about each one that I don't want to miss out that it would end up a huge post and need splitting back into individual posts! So this post will remain a collection of thoughts about The Burning Stone. (Spoilery both forwards and backwards in the series, but it's not new so I shan't put spoiler tags.)

At the end of book 2 (The Prince of Dogs, post) the series could've stopped with a sense of a "happy ending" albeit not one with all loose ends tied up. Alain has been acknowledged his father's son, legitimised, become heir and married a princess he actually loves. Liath and Sanglant are reunited, he's free, she has a place amongst the Eagles, and they have declared their love to each other. And this book takes that potential happy ending and shows you what happens after the story "ends" - not the last time Elliott does that in this series.

Alain's plotline is the working out of unintended consequences of good (and otherwise) deeds. At the end of the previous book Alain and Levastine had lead the army that defeated Bloodhand, ending the threat to the kingdom (which is what got them their rewards), a good and useful thing to do. But when they killed Bloodhand his curse on his killer was unleashed, and one by one five of the dogs and the Levastine himself succumb. Alain is now Count, but almost immediately his cousin (who would've inherited if Alain was not legitimised) brings a case against Alain saying that he's not really Levastine's son. At the hearing, everything rests on whether or not his wife will stick up for him. She carries enough clout, and this is a society where having family and kin matter, that she would turn the tide of opinion. But she not only doesn't stand by him, she lets everyone know that their marriage isn't really a marriage at all: it's not consummated. And why isn't is consummated? Alain was unwilling to rape her, instead he was wooing her and hoping one day she'd love him enough to want to sleep with him. And this now backfires on him, and leads to him ending up stripped of his countship and with his marriage annulled he's sent to serve with the Lions (the king's army). Of course, his wife (Tallia) doesn't get what she wanted either ... she naively thought that once single again she'd be sent back to her life as a cleric, whereas she actually gets married off to someone else that her mother wants an alliance with and her plotline in this book ends with her new husband doing what Alain would not, and raping her.

(It's odd how my reaction to the Marion Zimmer Bradley books is omg-so-rapey, and my reaction to these isn't despite there still being quite a bit of rape. I'm not sure why, so I'll just note that and think about it a bit more.)

Tallia is one of the characters that Elliott uses to highlight Alain's saintliness. I like how she does this - we're not told that Alain is a saint, but we are shown how people who believe themselves to be saints behave and then that's juxtaposed with Alain and his unfailing kindness and humility. Tallia has had a revelation about the nature of God, she's got stigmata and is regarded (by herself and some others) as a pious saint. But Alain discovers the rusty nail she's using to create the stigmata, and even without that smoking gun her behaviour is clearly that of a zealot and not a holy woman. Which is another way in which the religion in these books is realistically and interestingly messy & complicated - by the end of the series the heresy that Tallia is fanning the flames of becomes orthodox, and there's an indication that it was the original orthodoxy that was lost over time (tho aren't they always the "one true way"?). So she might've been a fraud but her ideas still took root.

Liath's plotline in this book parallels Alain's in many ways, both by being the same and by showing a contrast. The two marriages are the most obvious contrast - there are some similarities, after all Sanglant and Liath didn't really know each other well before they married. But as compared to Alain and Tallia there is a mutual attraction and a mutual desire to make it work out despite the difficulties. Another of the themes that's shared between Alain & Liath's stories is about fathers - the blood relationship is what the world sees as most important but is that really what matters? Alain may've met Count Levastine in adolescence, but they form a bond nonetheless and Alain is sad to have that ripped away. Liath's memories of her childhood are all about being on the run with her father - but she meets a woman in this book who claims to be her mother, and that her father was no such thing. Yet he's still the man who brought her up and cared for her and loved her, all utterly alien concepts to this cold and severe mother she's met. And both Alain and Liath end up ... elsewhere. The next book shows that this is necessary for both of them in their different ways to learn the things they need to know, but at the end here it's very much an involuntary severing of bonds.

And I've wittered on now for about a thousand words and I've only really talked about some of the things from this book. They've got great re-read potential for me, on this read through I was most interested in Alain, in Liath and in the magical plotline that's just starting to take off in this book. But there's a lot of other stuff going on, for instance the whole religious schism that I've only mentioned in passing.

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