"King's Dragon" Kate Elliott

I've read Kate Elliott's "King's Dragon" before - at least twice - and both times stalled out on the series before I got to the end, either because I couldn't get the books at the library or because I hadn't quite decided whether to buy or borrow them. Last time I read it I reviewed it in this blog too (post). So when I needed to think of some books to get on my kindle to take away with me (last spring!) this series came to mind as unfinished business. I finished reading this one in July 2015, and am writing it up (from notes made at the time) in January 2016 by which point I've finished the series, so this is not going to be the post you'd've got if I'd been more diligent about writing it! :) It's also not a review as such (and if you haven't read the books my previous review gives a bit more detail about the set up and characters), and there will be spoilers ahead for the whole series even tho I'm concentrating on this book in this post.

One of the things I wrote about before, and remembered as particularly liking, is that this series starts out with a fairly familiar set of epic fantasy tropes which it then proceeds to do something more interesting with than what one might expect. Our main point of view characters are a couple of Chosen One archetypes who live in a version of medieval Europe. Alain is a farm boy of uncertain parentage, destined for the Church but yearning for adventure. Liath is on the run with her father, learning philosophy, astronomy and magic but unable to ever settle down for fear they'll be killed by those who chase them. And the world around them has kings and princes, court intrigue, wars fought on horseback with swords, and a powerful Church. It isn't, however, generic and nor are any of the characters. One of the things I appreciated about this whole series is that it felt like a real world, and like the implications of the world building had been thought through.

An example of this is the religion of this world - it's flavoured with Christianity, although with many differences the key of which is that the orthodox opinion is that God is plural and they are both male and female. The senior officials of the Church, the biscops and the skopos (Pope equivalent), are all female. Mayors of towns are female. And there's a reasonable amount of the sort of casual sexism you'd expect from the characters about how men are unsuited for such roles. But, women still have the biological vulnerabilities that they have in reality - and just because women are "in power" in some arenas doesn't turn the society into something fluffy and peace loving. Which I appreciated, because every time I see someone say something about "if women ruled the world we wouldn't have X injustice happening" I wince - women are people too, and setting us up as inherently superior to men is no more right than as inherently inferior. So it was nice to see a world where women did have power and yet the world wasn't full of magical unicorns.

I felt that family was one of the dominant themes of the book (and series). People didn't just introduce themselves by name, but also by lineage. Legitimacy or otherwise is also important - bastards don't inherit, which is one of the key factors in Sanglant's story. And even though we see the action primarily via Alain and Liath, Sanglant is one of the key characters - the book is named after him, and his relationship with his father is critical to the politics. If his father didn't love him so much, then a lot of the events throughout the series wouldn't've happened. Returning to the theme of family - Liath and Alain are both set apart by their lack of claimable family. Liath doesn't know who her parents are related to, and Alain doesn't even know who his parents are for sure. Liath's family relationships become one of the linchpins of the entire series, precisely who she is matters more to the world (both everyday and magical) than she realises at this point.

Another thing I really liked about this world was that the religion and the magic felt as solidly real as the politics. I mentioned above about the differences in the Church affecting the society around it, but I also liked that the Church is not a monolith and not stocked solely with either pious clergy or scheming fraudsters. There are differences of opinion on what the scriptures mean and on precisely what people believe in (and a heresy touched on in this book and will have repercussions throughout the series). The clergy are people - some are devout, some are not; some are in their positions because of their secular rank, some are not. And those are two separate axes. It's a complicated mess of an institution, as you'd expect for a religion that's a few centuries old.

Magic is officially regarded as evil by the church (as in our world) but it actually works (unlike our world). It's a very medieval sort of magic - alchemy rather than abracadabra. Liath is learning the theory, and she is learning from books and constructing her own memory palace in her mind where she can walk through to retrieve facts. She's also learning astronomy, mathematics and so on, which is all linked just like alchemists thought it would be in our world. It's a magical system based on knowing or intuiting the secrets and fundamental principles of the universe. It's also not without limitations & flaws. For instance, in practical terms one of the more useful pieces of magic we see is the ability to see through fire for a vision of what's happening elsewhere to someone. And it's limited by what you see (literally) when you look - if someone is passed out cold on the floor somewhere with wounds all over him, you'll probably think he's dead. So this provides a way of getting more information about far off events more quickly than you can by mundane methods, but it can also provide disinformation.

I'm glad I finally got round to getting the whole series - there's definitely re-read potential here, just looking stuff up for this post I've remembered a few things I thought were background at this point that turn out to be much more important later on.

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